Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11401/66138
Title: Use impairments of Jamaica Bay
Authors: Bubolo, Nicole Justine
Chang, Sherry
Larese. Stephen
Reigert, Maria
Torre, F. Jason
Marine Sciences Research Center
West-Valle, Anne S.
Decker, Cynthia Jane
Swanson, Robert Lawrence
Preservation Department, Stony Brook University Libraries
Keywords: Marine Sciences.
Atmospheric Sciences.
Environmental impact analysis > New York (State) > Jamaica Bay.
Estuarine ecology > New York (State) > Jamaica Bay.
Water quality > New York (State) > Jamaica Bay.
Jamaica Bay (N.Y.).
Issue Date: 1992
Publisher: Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University
Citation: West-Valle, Anne S. Use impairments of Jamaica Bay / Anne S. West-Valle, Cynthia J. Decker, R.L. Swanson. Stony Brook, N.Y. : Marine Sciences Research Center, The University at Stony Brook, [1992].
Series/Report no.: Special report (State University of New York at Stony Brook. Marine Sciences Research Center);99
Abstract: from the conclusion, ". . .Broad categories of use impairment in Jamaica Bay that are causing significant losses of ecological, economic or social values are 1) limited opportunities for swimming and other watercontact recreation, 2) unsafe seafoods, 3) losses of commercial and recreational fisheries, 4) loss or modification of habitat. Causes of these impairments include 1) human pathogens, 2) toxic substances and 3) excess nutrient loadings, in addition to the others mentioned previously. Measures of such impairments are not standardized, nor in many cases, totally quantifiable. The specific subsets of these impairments that have been examined are listed in Table 21. These impairments are overlapping throughout the Bay and may be caused by a variety of factors often acting synergistically. In addition, the causal agents may have both direct and indirect effects. For example, contaminants may, at low levels, directly jeopardize the health of finfish or shellfish by lowering reproductive capacity. They may indirectly affect human health via the consumption of those organisms. . ."
Description: 187 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. Includes bibliographical references.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1951/61692
http://hdl.handle.net/11401/66138
Appears in Collections:Special Reports

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