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Chastising Female Chastity: Social Criticisms of Female Virtue in Cyril Tourneur's The Revenger's Tragedy, Thomas Middleton's The Second Maiden's Tragedy, and Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher's The Maid's Tragedy

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dc.contributor.advisor Videbaek, Bente en_US
dc.contributor.author Karasik, Samantha en_US
dc.contributor.other Department of English en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2013-05-22T17:34:54Z
dc.date.accessioned 2015-04-24T14:46:54Z
dc.date.available 2013-05-22T17:34:54Z
dc.date.available 2015-04-24T14:46:54Z
dc.date.issued 2011-12-01 en_US
dc.identifier Karasik_grad.sunysb_0771M_10759 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1951/59720 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11401/71290 en_US
dc.description 70 pg. en_US
dc.description.abstract The objective of this analysis is to chronicle the idealization and subsequent deprecation of the chaste Renaissance woman in three seventeenth century revenge tragedies. This paper first explores Renaissance society's expectations for female chastity and examines how these rigidly defined rules for maidens and wives were once strictly enforced by men. Cyril Tourneur's "&Idquo The Revenger's Tragedy &rdquo" illustrates this obsession with protecting female virtue in a world where women were beginning to break free from the constraints of strict gender and sexual codes of behavior. Next, this paper segues into a discussion of how societal corruption threatens the existence of this romanticized female figure. In Thomas Middleton's "The Second Maiden's Tragedy ", the only truly moral woman cannot live a pure life in her sinful surroundings while a formerly virtuous woman learns that guidelines for chastity are useless and worthy of mockery. From there, this piece then examines the eventual disappearance of female chastity in a decadent world that no longer upholds the same moral values. After studying Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher's "&Idquo The Maid's Tragedy rdquo," it is clear that this model of female perfection has faded into oblivion, replaced by women who care more about their needs and desires than their virtue. Finally, this thesis considers what social factors motivated women to rebel from these traditional gender conventions and how Renaissance society was forced to reevaluate its views of women. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This work is sponsored by the Stony Brook University Graduate School in compliance with the requirements for completion of degree. en_US
dc.format Monograph en_US
dc.format.medium Electronic Resource en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher The Graduate School, Stony Brook University: Stony Brook, NY. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh British and Irish literature en_US
dc.title Chastising Female Chastity: Social Criticisms of Female Virtue in Cyril Tourneur's The Revenger's Tragedy, Thomas Middleton's The Second Maiden's Tragedy, and Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher's The Maid's Tragedy en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.mimetype Application/PDF en_US


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