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A Comparison of Two Theoretical Approaches to Addressing Ageism: Education and Extended Contact

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dc.contributor.advisor Levy, Sheri R en_US
dc.contributor.author Lytle, Ashley Elizabeth en_US
dc.contributor.other Department of Social/Health Psychology en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-20T16:51:11Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-20T16:51:11Z
dc.date.issued 2016-12-01 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11401/76794 en_US
dc.description 86 pg. en_US
dc.description.abstract Ageism continues to be a widespread problem and is of increasing concern given the growing older population worldwide and youth-centered focus of many societies. Despite the need for a better understanding of attitudes towards older adults, ageism is a relatively understudied area of social psychology. This dissertation sought, for the first time, to compare two theoretical approaches to addressing ageism: education about aging (providing accurate information about aging) and extended contact (knowledge of positive intergenerational contact) as well as their potential combined impact (education plus extended contact). Across two studies, participants were randomly assigned to one of the four conditions: education, extended contact, combined condition, and a control condition. As expected, in Study 1, participants (community adults ages 18-59) in all three experimental conditions (vs. participants in the control condition) reported decreased negative attitudes toward older adults and increased aging knowledge immediately after the study. Building upon the design of Study 1, in Study 2, attitudes toward older adults were assessed before, immediately after the conditions, and in a delayed post-test. In Study 2, participants (undergraduate students) in all three experimental conditions (vs. participants in the control condition) reported decreased negative attitudes toward older adults as well as increased aging knowledge. Generally speaking, the three experimental conditions did not differ from one another pointing to the efficacy of the theoretical background underlying each experimental condition. Overall, these findings point to the effectiveness of a brief online intervention in reducing ageist attitudes among age-diverse adult community members as well as undergraduate students. Implications and future directions are discussed. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This work is sponsored by the Stony Brook University Graduate School in compliance with the requirements for completion of degree. en_US
dc.format Monograph en_US
dc.format.medium Electronic Resource en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher The Graduate School, Stony Brook University: Stony Brook, NY. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Psychology -- Social psychology en_US
dc.subject.other ageism, education, extended contact, intervention, older adults en_US
dc.title A Comparison of Two Theoretical Approaches to Addressing Ageism: Education and Extended Contact en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.mimetype Application/PDF en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember London, Bonita en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember Eaton, Nicholas en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember Bear, Julia. en_US


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