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WILLFUL FORGETTING: “WHITE INDIANS,†TRAUMA, AND RELATIONALITY IN AMERICAN HISTORICAL LITERATURE

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dc.contributor.advisor Newman, Andrew en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Scheckel, Susan en_US
dc.contributor.author Hankinson, Kathleen en_US
dc.contributor.other Department of English en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-20T16:52:50Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-20T16:52:50Z
dc.date.issued 2016-12-01 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11401/77507 en_US
dc.description 186 pg. en_US
dc.description.abstract This work proposes a critical vocabulary for the study of American historical literature and Native American literature in the light of the genocide of Native America. Considering this genocide in terms of trauma theory (including perpetrator trauma) and relationality theory, it becomes clear that a “working-through†for the non-native postgenerations who have unintentionally inherited stolen lands (along with a self/other construction of non-Native and Native Americans) is ethically and socially desirable. In transcending the dominant self/other paradigm, one’s orientation to US American and Native American historical literature is not about possessing knowledge of these histories and literatures, but rather knowing them in the relational sense, in terms of one’s holistic relation to them in the present. The “white Indian,†a historical or literary figure who has inhabited both EuroAmerican and Native society either symbolically or in reality, is a helpful point of focus in the study of both relational intersubjectivity and narrative strategies used to encourage the forgetting of genocide. Narratives by and about “white Indians†from the seventeenth century up until today can represent and perform various forms and degrees of relationality; they can also represent and perform the forgetting or justification of Native American genocide. Teaching these texts not as “dead letters†but as living messages deserving of an ethical and social response can encourage the working-through necessary to achieve more of a healing intercultural intersubjectivity. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This work is sponsored by the Stony Brook University Graduate School in compliance with the requirements for completion of degree. en_US
dc.format Monograph en_US
dc.format.medium Electronic Resource en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher The Graduate School, Stony Brook University: Stony Brook, NY. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh American literature -- Native American studies en_US
dc.subject.other American historical literature, Early American Literature, Genocide, Native American Literature, Relationality theory, Trauma theory en_US
dc.title WILLFUL FORGETTING: “WHITE INDIANS,†TRAUMA, AND RELATIONALITY IN AMERICAN HISTORICAL LITERATURE en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US
dc.mimetype Application/PDF en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember Kaplan, E. Ann en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember Welburn, Ron. en_US


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