DSpace Repository

Language, Science, Society, and the Line between Human and Animal in Swift's Gulliver's Travels and Wells's The Island of Doctor Moreau

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Hammond, Eugene R en_US
dc.contributor.author Schultheiss, Adam en_US
dc.contributor.other Department of English. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-20T16:52:56Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-20T16:52:56Z
dc.date.issued 2013-12-01 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11401/77582 en_US
dc.description 38 pg. en_US
dc.description.abstract This thesis examines line between human and non-human animals in Jonathan Swift's <italic>Gulliver's Travels</italic> and H.G. Wells's <italic>The Island of Doctor Moreau</italic>. Both <italic>Gulliver's Travels</italic> and <italic>The Island of Doctor Moreau</italic> examine this separation through the prism of language, societal views of animality, and biology. Looking back at the history surrounding the idea that man is separate from, and superior to, animals, one finds that it can be traced back in western tradition to the Bible, and is so ingrained in our language that it is difficult for narrators such as Lemuel Gulliver and Edward Prendick to recount their experiences when they see this separation fall apart. This concept is traced through time, and the events and attitudes surrounding the authorship of these books are examined in order to determine possible influences in penning these tales. The language of narration is dissected, and the use of language between characters in these stories is explored to demonstrate that ultimately, in <italic>Gulliver's Travels</italic> and <italic>The Island of Doctor Moreau</italic>, human speech, outward appearance, and ancient beliefs are superficial, inconsequential differences between humans and animals. In these tales, our inner workings and biology paint a picture of unity between man and other animals. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This work is sponsored by the Stony Brook University Graduate School in compliance with the requirements for completion of degree. en_US
dc.format Monograph en_US
dc.format.medium Electronic Resource en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher The Graduate School, Stony Brook University: Stony Brook, NY. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Literature en_US
dc.title Language, Science, Society, and the Line between Human and Animal in Swift's Gulliver's Travels and Wells's The Island of Doctor Moreau en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.mimetype Application/PDF en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember Tondre, Michael. en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account